Malka & Kravitz, P.A. - Your Construction Law Firm
South Florida Construction Attorneys
Phone: 954-828-2807 | Toll Free: 888-341-9053
Menu Contact

What are some signs of window defects?

Whether your windows are part of a new construction or you had a contractor put them in as an update to your existing home or building, window defects can spell trouble for your structure and your budget. On the minor side, a window leak reduces the efficiency of heating and cooling systems in your home, pushing up your utility bills. On the major side, a window leak could let moisture into the structure, leading to mold, rot and even collapse. Here are a few signs your windows or window installation might be defective.

If you have double-paned windows and condensation is forming between the panels, then you have a seal leak. That means the seals somewhere on the panes failed. This usually doesn't impact your building structure but can be annoying and lead to mildew inside your panes. The solution is usually to replace the pane where the seal failed.

If your windows don't open and shut easily, it can be a sign of several things. If they've never opened properly, then the installation might be faulty, which means you'll want to speak to your contractor or seek remedies for construction defects. Windows that sometimes stick can be an indication that wood around the area is swelling and contracting with humidity. You might want to speak to someone about planing down the wood or sealing it to avoid humidity interference.

Finally, if water is getting in around the windows, either you aren't closing your windows tightly, a seal is broken or the window wasn't installed properly. Make sure you understand the guarantees on any work done to your home so you know if the construction company in question should replace or repair damages. If you can't get damages addressed appropriately, you can talk to a Fort Lauderdale construction law professional about options.

Source: Popular Mechanics, "7 Things Your Windows Are Trying to Tell You," Brett Martin, accessed Aug. 05, 2016

No Comments

Leave a comment
Comment Information

Contact Form

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy