Board-Certified In Construction Law By The Florida Bar

Although in our litigation experience it is not typical for someone to assert that a contractor’s contract to “furnish and install” is subject to the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”) governing sales of goods, we have seen lawyers do it. Significant consequences can flow from the legal conclusion that a contract is governed by the UCC rather than by common law contract rules. For example, the standard for whether a contract has been breached is different under the UCC than it is under the common law, and the UCC implies into contracts (reads into contracts) warranties that the common law does not (and vice versa). So, a party vying for an advantage (to the disadvantage of the other party) in a breach of contract action might assert that the contract is subject to the UCC.  Read More . . .

Archives